Press Release: Human Rights Network Releases a Rapid Response Guide

 

For Immediate Release

June 15, 2017

For More Info:

Helping Communities Respond to Hate:

Montana Human Rights Network Releases a Rapid Response Guide

The Montana Human Rights Network and its affiliate Love Lives Here have created an infographic tool that provides step-by-step instructions for how community members can respond to incidents of hate. The Rapid Response Guide can be found at http://www.mhrn.org/rapidresponseguide/.

As incidents of harassment, discrimination, and violence have increased over the last eight months, the Montana Human Rights Network and Love Lives Here routinely are one of the first to connect with local communities who have been the targets of hate incidents and want to take positive, constructive action. The Rapid Response Guide provides concrete steps that report the activity to the proper organizations and build stronger connections within these communities.

The action steps in the Guide are best practices learned by Love Lives Here while helping the Whitefish community respond to attacks from The Daily Stormer, a national white supremacist website. The Stormer’s “troll army” targeted community members and businesses, while the website’s founder threatened to have an armed march in Whitefish. A recap of these events can be read here.

National experts and media outlets have called Whitefish’s response the “gold standard” other communities can follow. During a recent speaking tour in Montana, Christian Picciolini, a former white supremacist skinhead who now helps others leave the movement through his organization Life After Hate, said, “Even under threat of an armed march, Whitefish came together as a community, and that’s exactly the right thing to do.”

The Network and Love Lives Here distilled the lessons they learned down to the steps included in the Guide, and it provides answers of what to do at the local level, something Love Lives Here stressed in Whitefish.

“If we want to make a change as a community, our best way to do that is at the grassroots, local level,” Will Randall, chair of Love Lives Here, told Yahoo News. “That’s where we can confront these issues of racism and anti-Semitism and bigotry first. It’s not just someone on social media making a comment — thumbs up, thumbs down. It’s neighbors meeting face-to-face and coordinating plans to put their values out there. It’s pretty powerful stuff.”

In addition to the link above, the Rapid Response Guide and the Montana Hate Incident Reporting Form can be accessed through the homepage of the Montana Human Rights Network at http://mhrn.org/.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For Immediate Release

June 15, 2017

 

For More Info:

 

Helping Communities Respond to Hate:

Human Rights Network Releases a Rapid Response Guide

 

The Montana Human Rights Network and its affiliate Love Lives Here have created an infographic tool that provides step-by-step instructions for how community members can respond to incidents of hate. The Rapid Response Guide can be found at http://www.mhrn.org/rapidresponseguide/.

 

As incidents of harassment, discrimination, and violence have increased over the last eight months, the Montana Human Rights Network and Love Lives Here routinely are one of the first to connect with local communities who have been the targets of hate incidents and want to take positive, constructive action. The Rapid Response Guide provides concrete steps that report the activity to the proper organizations and build stronger connections within these communities.

 

The action steps in the Guide are best practices learned by Love Lives Here while helping the Whitefish community respond to attacks from The Daily Stormer, a national white supremacist website. The Stormer’s “troll army” targeted community members and businesses, while the website’s founder threatened to have an armed march in Whitefish. A recap of these events can be read here.

 

National experts and media outlets have called Whitefish’s response the “gold standard” other communities can follow. During a recent speaking tour in Montana, Christian Picciolini, a former white supremacist skinhead who now helps others leave the movement through his organization Life After Hate, said, “Even under threat of an armed march, Whitefish came together as a community, and that’s exactly the right thing to do.”

 

The Network and Love Lives Here distilled the lessons they learned down to the steps included in the Guide, and it provides answers of what to do at the local level, something Love Lives Here stressed in Whitefish.

 

“If we want to make a change as a community, our best way to do that is at the grassroots, local level,” Will Randall, chair of Love Lives Here, told Yahoo News. “That’s where we can confront these issues of racism and anti-Semitism and bigotry first. It’s not just someone on social media making a comment — thumbs up, thumbs down. It’s neighbors meeting face-to-face and coordinating plans to put their values out there. It’s pretty powerful stuff.”

 

In addition to the link above, the Rapid Response Guide and the Montana Hate Incident Reporting Form can be accessed through the homepage of the Montana Human Rights Network at http://mhrn.org/.

 

##

 

 

 

 

 

 

For Immediate Release

June 15, 2017

 

For More Info:

 

Helping Communities Respond to Hate:

Human Rights Network Releases a Rapid Response Guide

 

The Montana Human Rights Network and its affiliate Love Lives Here have created an infographic tool that provides step-by-step instructions for how community members can respond to incidents of hate. The Rapid Response Guide can be found at http://www.mhrn.org/rapidresponseguide/.

 

As incidents of harassment, discrimination, and violence have increased over the last eight months, the Montana Human Rights Network and Love Lives Here routinely are one of the first to connect with local communities who have been the targets of hate incidents and want to take positive, constructive action. The Rapid Response Guide provides concrete steps that report the activity to the proper organizations and build stronger connections within these communities.

 

The action steps in the Guide are best practices learned by Love Lives Here while helping the Whitefish community respond to attacks from The Daily Stormer, a national white supremacist website. The Stormer’s “troll army” targeted community members and businesses, while the website’s founder threatened to have an armed march in Whitefish. A recap of these events can be read here.

 

National experts and media outlets have called Whitefish’s response the “gold standard” other communities can follow. During a recent speaking tour in Montana, Christian Picciolini, a former white supremacist skinhead who now helps others leave the movement through his organization Life After Hate, said, “Even under threat of an armed march, Whitefish came together as a community, and that’s exactly the right thing to do.”

 

The Network and Love Lives Here distilled the lessons they learned down to the steps included in the Guide, and it provides answers of what to do at the local level, something Love Lives Here stressed in Whitefish.

 

“If we want to make a change as a community, our best way to do that is at the grassroots, local level,” Will Randall, chair of Love Lives Here, told Yahoo News. “That’s where we can confront these issues of racism and anti-Semitism and bigotry first. It’s not just someone on social media making a comment — thumbs up, thumbs down. It’s neighbors meeting face-to-face and coordinating plans to put their values out there. It’s pretty powerful stuff.”

 

In addition to the link above, the Rapid Response Guide and the Montana Hate Incident Reporting Form can be accessed through the homepage of the Montana Human Rights Network at http://mhrn.org/.

 

##

Advertisements

One thought on “Press Release: Human Rights Network Releases a Rapid Response Guide

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s